Babies up to 13 months

Information on vaccines for babies up to 13 months of age to help protect against tetanus, mumps, measles, whooping cough, some of the main causes of meningitis and septicaemia and other diseases.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Immunisation is the safest and most effective way of protecting your baby against serious diseases. 

By having your baby immunised at the recommended times, you are helping protect them through early childhood against diseases such as diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis), polio, measles, mumps, rubella and some of the main causes of meningitis and septicaemia. 

Immunisations at 2 months:

DTaP/IPV/Hib vaccine
Helps protect against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib).  

Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV)
Provides some protection against a form of bacterial meningitis caused by pneumococcal bacteria, as well as other conditions such as severe ear infections and pneumonia caused by pneumococcal bacteria.

Rotavirus vaccine
Helps protect against rotavirus, an infection that causes severe diarrhoea and vomiting in babies and young children.

MenB vaccine
Helps protect against meningitis and septicaemia caused by meningococcal type B bacteria.

Immunisations at 3 months:

DTaP/IPV/Hib vaccine
Helps protect against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib).  

Rotavirus vaccine 
Helps protect against rotavirus, an infection that causes severe diarrhoea and vomiting in babies and young children.

Immunisations at 4 months:

DTaP/IPV/Hib vaccine
Helps protect against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib).  

Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV)
Provides some protection against a form of bacterial meningitis caused by pneumococcal bacteria, as well as other conditions such as severe ear infections and pneumonia caused by pneumococcal bacteria.

MenB vaccine
Helps protect against meningitis and septicaemia caused by meningococcal type B bacteria.

Immunisations between 12 and 13 months - within a month of the first birthday:

Hib/MenC vaccine
Helps protect against Hib and meningitis C infections.  

MMR vaccine
Helps protect against measles, mumps and rubella.  

Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV)
Provides some protection against a form of bacterial meningitis caused by pneumococcal bacteria, as well as other conditions such as severe ear infections and pneumonia caused by pneumococcal bacteria.

MenB vaccine
Helps protect against meningitis and septicaemia caused by meningococcal type B bacteria.

What are the changes to the immunisation programme for babies aged up to 12-13 months?

A new vaccine, to help protect against meningococcal type B bacteria, has been added to the routine immunisations offered to babies born from 1 May 2015. The Men B vaccine is given at the 2, 4 and 12 months visits. The programme has been simplified for babies, with four vaccines being given at the 2 month visit and four vaccines between 12 and 13 months visit - within a month of the first birthday.

Why has the 12 and 13 month immunisation been changed?

Immunisation programmes are regularly reviewed by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) to make sure that all children are offered the best protection against preventable diseases. As new vaccines become available, or research shows that giving existing vaccines at different times improves protection, the programme will be improved. 

The JCVI recommended that babies be given the MenB vaccine, from two months of age, along with the other vaccines at their routine visits. Adding the MenB to the routine visits, simplifies the schedule and reduces the number of appointments parents have to make. The change is intended to provide earlier protection and less distress to the child than multiple appointments.

Is it safe for the four vaccines to be given at the same visit?

Yes, it is safe to have these recommended four vaccines at the same time (at the 2 month and 12 month visits) and they will protect your baby from some very serious infections.

The JCVI considered all the evidence very thoroughly, which showed the four vaccines can be safely given at the same time. As with all vaccines, possible side effects can include redness, swelling or tenderness where they had the injection, and temperature (fever). Fever can be expected after any immunisation, but is more common when the MenB vaccine is given with the other routine vaccines under 1 year. This is why paracetamol is recommended (see MenB page for more information). 

If you are concerned about any reaction your baby has had to a vaccine, talk to your doctor, practice nurse or health visitor. Parents and carers can also report suspected side effects of vaccines and medicines through the Yellow Card Scheme. This can be done online by visiting www.yellowcard.gov.uk or by calling the free Yellow Card hotline on 0808 100 3352 (available Monday to Friday – 10 am to 2 pm).

Non-routine immunisations:

BCG vaccine
Usually offered to babies who are more likely to come into contact with someone with tuberculosis (TB).  

Hepatitis B vaccine 
Offered to any baby whose mother or close family has been infected with hepatitis B.

Flu                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Children with underlying medical conditions are offered an annual flu vaccine from 6 months of age. All children aged 2 and older are offered a nasal spray flu vaccine every year.  

More information:

A guide to childhood immunisations up to 5 years of age
Information for parents on all the routine immunisations given to babies and young children to protect them from serious childhood diseases.

What to expect after immunisation
Important information for parents about what to expect after their child receives an immunisation.

For advice and information on any health topic, you can call the NHS Helpline on 0800 22 44 88 (8am–10pm, 7 days).

Last reviewed on 05 September 2016

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